KITTY BRAZELTONCatalog of Scores

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MUSIC FOR LARGE ENSEMBLES (7-12)

septets

octets

nonets

ten-tets to twelve-tets

NAME OF WORK DESCRIPTION DATE COMPOSED LENGTH INSTR. PERFORMANCE(S)
7's

Time Remaining

  1. opening
  2. eden's elegy
  3. driving force
  4. one
  5. two
  6. motet
  7. time ritual 1
  8. angharad runs
  9. match
  10. pillars
  11. wall
  12. floor duets
  13. eden emerges
  14. time ritual 2
  15. undertow
  16. ending
live music commissioned by Gina Gibney Dance for an evening-length work
2002 52 min. TTBB male vocal quartet, cello, percussion (concert bass drum, modified kit, bells, hammered dulcimer), computer-processed soundtracks and drones

Premiered by Gina Gibney Dance (7 female dancers, 6 male musicians + Brazelton on laptop) October 2002, St. Mark's Danspace, and November 2002, Cleveland Public Theater. Reviews N.Y.Times, Cleveland Plain Dealer, Dance Insider.

Countertenor: David Bryan
Tenor: John Brauer
Baritone: Keith Borden
Bass: Mark Lin
Cello: Matt Goeke
Percussion: Alex Vittum
Laptop: Kitty Brazelton

Sonata for the Inner Ear

  • Exposition
  • Development
  • Recapitulation

CRI CD Kitty Brazelton

included on CD "Kitty Brazelton: Chamber Music for the Inner Ear" released March 2002, CRI-Emergency 889

3 modular movements deconstructing sonata form---is it valid?---Exposition establishes motives a and b in multiple configurations; Development invites all 8 players to solo on these ideas; Recapitulation restates and wraps up bang.

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1999 23 min. for the California EAR Unit: flute, bass clarinet, violin, cello, 2 keyboards (piano and sampler using processed dialogue by EAR members), marimba and drum set. Los Angeles County Museum, October 13, 1999. Recorded in 2001 for release in 2002 on "Kitty Brazelton: Chamber Music for the Inner Ear", CRI-Emergency 889

Your Mad Mad Love,

In The Eye Of The Storm

2 chamber rock songs 1996 3 min., 7 min. for Randall Woolf's CAMP: rock voice, trumpet, bass clarinet, organ, electric guitar, bass and drums Context Studio, August 1996, The Cooler, July 1997.
8's
The Battle
of X and Y
An algebraic battle between ostinato x and bridge y. Structured ensemble improvisation. Virtuosic rhythm. 1999 7 min. for Relâche: oboe, tenor sax, bassoon, viola, piano, double bass and drum set Premiered by Relâche in May 2001 in Philadelphia at the Institute of Contemporary Art and at the Philadelphia Ethical Society.
Eight-Eyed Spy Flute octet in memory of local NYC '80s pop band 1997 7 min. for 8 flutes unperformed
Lullaby for Handbells

Ensemble lullaby with lighting and movement, dedicated to a newborn Rosie Mandel, commissioned by Corn Palace Productions for New Music America '92. 1992 15 min. for six handbell players accompanied by electric bass and amplified voice, The Southern Theater, Minneapolis, October 1992, New Music America
9's
as the day goes by…
(requiem for 9/11)

as the day goes by… reflects my reactions to the September 11, 2001, attack on the city where I live.

October 2001 25 min. for Relâche: oboe, tenor sax, bassoon, viola, piano, double bass and drum set Premiered by Relâche at Delaware Center for Contemporary Art & The Philadelphia Ethical Society, Nov. 30 - Dec. 2, 2001. Review Philadelphia Inquirer. Also webcast with interview on newmusicbox.org in March 2002.

Commissioned spring 2001 by Philadelphia new music ensemble Relâche for a 12-18 minute chamber octet, this was not the piece I expected to write. Nor, even in October 2001, the piece I wanted to write.

I have gotten a lot of solace out of the openness with which my fellow New Yorkers have shared their feelings since the attack. However they and I share, too, a reticence to formalize or make these feelings more than privately expressed.

But when I sat down to write the octet on October 3, with only a month before the ensemble would need to see a finished score in time to prepare for the premiere performances on November 30, December 1 and 2, I found I had no choice. The twin tower tragedy was all I could write about.

The music I've written should not be interpreted as some literal soundscape particular only to events of September 11th—I have tried to draw from the specifics to create something more universal—so if the listener doesn't choose to relate it to September 11th, she/he welcome to perceive on an absolute musical level.

I have tried to portray the emotional process of struggling to comprehend something violently incomprehensible. I try to enact the jagged dissonance between the juxtaposed flashbacks—the first, to what it was like before, and the inevitable second, to what it was like then, during the event. What is the nature of the innocence of "before"? Are the spores of what was to come now perceptible in hindsight? And the impossible horror of "then"—can there ever be resolution or redemption?

In the middle of As the day goes by… the Trinidadian steel pan played by Harvey Price emerges. I imagine the instrument as a sort of angel. The melodies and sounds from "before" and "then" are re-integrated more gently, bending and softening to each other in a shimmering Afro-Caribbean timbre—I call that part "song."

I conclude the section "song" with two songs, specific references from the outside world: one, the medieval Catholic requiem chant "dies irae" (day of wrath) with text from the original 12th-c. poem (which is even more eerily predictive of the firestorm and ashes of September 11), interwoven with two, a melody I have transcribed from a reading of the Koran. Because use of this melody and text may be offensive to those who practice Islam, I only use the opening word "bismillah" (blessed be), and I am willing to alter the word so as to make it unrecognizable if an audience member is uncomfortable. My intent is to make consonant these texts and melodies and by inference, the civilizations they represent.

I don't know if the listener will find resolution or harmony in As the day goes by… I hope so—it would be a way that I could help. In the end, though, the horror and consequences of September 11th are something only the passage of time will heal "as the day goes by…"

Selected repertoire from Brazelton electroacoustic nonet DADADAH

Song for Todd, Walkin' On My Beat, Green Onions In The Field, Go No Further

Compositions for DADADAH. Song for Todd and Green Onions... use untexted voice while Walkin'... and Go... have lyrics. Walkin'... is the longest containing a long interlude called My Mexico duo for cello & bass with brass, harp and drum incursions. 1998 5-10 min. for Brazelton's nine-piece electro-acoustic ensemble DADADAH: voice, alto sax, horn, trombone, harp, cello, electric guitar, electric bass, drums & percussion CB's Lounge, CBGB's, New York City, November 1997-July 1998 monthly residency.

Open the Window (& Look Out), Soul Kiss, U'r N Love N U Dono Y, Thing Of Beauty, Around You, Waitin' For Ya Baby, Sex Wind Dream, Cinderella's Sister

you can hear Cinderella's Sister at http://www.arcananet.org/newmusicradio choose Joe Pehrson's 5/15/98 interview with Kitty Brazelton

Songs for DADADAH recorded Sept. 1-3, 1995. Released on CD "Love Not Love Lust Not Lust" 1999.

All but Open the Window released on "Love Not Love Lust Not Lust"

1995 3-12 min. each for DADADAH: voice, French horn, harp, trombone, saxophone, flute, cello, electric guitar and electric bass, drums. Knitting Factory, NYC, August 29-31;
From Her Story Autobiographical musical narrative recorded by DADADAH, Labor Day, 1995. Released on CD "Love Not Love Lust Not Lust" 1999. 1993 26 min. for DADADAH: voice, French horn, harp, trombone, saxophone, flute, cello, electric guitar and electric bass, drums. The Nuyorican Poets Cafe for International Women's Month, March 1993
Rise Up
Rise Up!
Song and instrumental suite containing the traditional blues, House Of The Rising Sun, revisited.Recorded and nationally released on DADADAH CD "Rise Up!" (Accurate/Distortion Records, May 1994. Nationally reviewed.) September 1991 14 min. for DADADAH: voice, French horn, harp, trombone, saxophone, flute, cello, electric guitar and electric bass, drums. The Knitting Factory, The Firewall Festival, Merce Cunningham Dance Studio, Nuyorican Poets Cafe, P.S. 122, NYC, 1990-91.
Snow White Rose Red Premiered by DADADAH at the Knitting Factory, The Firewall Festival, Merce Cunningham Dance Studio, Nuyorican Poets Cafe, P.S. 122, NYC, 1990-91. Recorded and nationally released on DADADAH CD "Rise Up!" 1991 (1981) 9 min. for DADADAH: voice, French horn, harp, trombone, saxophone, flute, cello, electric guitar and electric bass, drums. The Knitting Factory, The Firewall Festival, Merce Cunningham Dance Studio, Nuyorican Poets Cafe, P.S. 122, NYC, 1990-91.
The Night Is Mine Anti-war protest. Recorded and nationally released on DADADAH CD "Rise Up!" 1991 7 min. for DADADAH The Knitting Factory, etc., NYC, 1990-91.
Don't Look Back Exploded song form with fugue. Recorded and nationally released on DADADAH CD "Rise Up!" 1991 5 min. for DADADAH The Knitting Factory, etc., NYC, 1990-91.
Little Gamelan Da Gamelan influenced song. Recorded and nationally released on DADADAH CD "Rise Up!" 1991 5 min. for DADADAH The Knitting Factory, etc., NYC, 1990-91.
Dance Suite
  • TEXTURE 1
  • TEXTURE 2
  • TEXTURE 3
  • TEXTURE 4—6 Machines
  • TEXTURE 5 "My Perfect Toes"
  • 5 symphonic movements re-interpreted in the modern idiom originally commissioned by choreographer Rebecca Romero. Recorded and nationally released on DADADAH CD "Rise Up!" (Accurate/Distortion Records, May 1994. Nationally reviewed.) 1990 26 min. for DADADAH: voice, French horn, harp, trombone, saxophone, flute, cello, electric guitar, drums (electric bass added later) Columbia Teacher's College, 1990; The Knitting Factory, LaMama Galleria, P.S.122, CBGB's, The Nuyorican Poets Cafe, NYC, 1990-94.
    10-12's
    Consider the Carving Knife This is a big brawny, funny piece about "the conundrum of married life". 2001 20 min. for Kitchen House Blend (ten-tet)+ me: voice, violin, cello, alto and bari saxes/bass clarinet/flute, tenor sax, trumpet, trombone, piano, double bass, drum set, marimba, log drum and other percussion. The Kitchen, NYC, April, 2000. First in the Kitchen House Blend series curated by composer John King. Also on the bill, House Blend premieres by composer/performers Craig Harris and David Krakauer.
    much of DADADAH's post-1995 repertoire was expanded and orchestrated for added player-guests during our two-year monthly residency at CB's Lounge, NYC. Added instruments included clarinet, oboe, upright bass, second cello, second flute, tuba, piano, tabla, mandolin, synthesizer and voice.

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    Photo in the background shows Brazelton and DADADAH live on an outdoor stage in the plaza between the two World Trade Center towers before they were destroyed. The concert took place in June 1997 as part of the Knitting Factory Festival and was taped for broadcast on Voice of America. The photograph was taken by Judy Schiller. From left to right: Chris Washburne (trombone), Mark Taylor (horn), Phillip Johnston (alto sax), Roger Kleier (electric guitar—subbing for Hui Cox), Kitty Brazelton, Todd Turkisher (drums), Martha Colby (cello) and Park Stickney (harp). The the photo tiles and repeats itself. If you want to learn more, please go to the DADADAH portion of this website: http://www.kitbraz.com/bndl/ddd/ where there are many photos and sound clips of this wonderful group.

    contact me: mail@kitbraz.com

    © 1999-2003, Catherine Bowles Brazelton.